Federal, State and Tribal Funding Sources

Federal Funds

U.S. EPA Targeted Brownfields Assessments (TBAs) - Region 1

EPA Region 1 provides Targeted Brownfield Assessments (TBAs) which are designed to inventory, characterize, and assess brownfield sites using EPA contractors. The TBA program is open for requests year round, and features a non-competitive application process for the award of assessment services. Services include site assessments, cleanup options and cost estimates, and community outreach. Services are for an average of $100,000. The sites for this program are selected locally, once a year. For more information, contact Alan Peterson at peterson.alan@epa.gov or (617) 918-1022.

U.S. EPA Targeted Brownfields Assessments (TBAs) - Region 3

EPA Region 3 provides Targeted Brownfield Assessments (TBAs) which are designed to inventory, characterize, and assess brownfield sites using EPA contractors. The TBA program is open for requests year round, and features a non-competitive application process for the award of assessment services. Services include site assessments, cleanup options and cost estimates, and community outreach. Services are for an average of $100,000. The sites for this program are selected locally, once a year. For more information, contact Mike Taurino at (215) 814-3371 or taurino.michael@epa.gov.

U.S. EPA Targeted Brownfields Assessments (TBAs) - Region 4

EPA Region 4 provides Targeted Brownfield Assessments (TBAs) which are designed to inventory, characterize, and assess brownfield sites using EPA contractors. The TBA program is open for requests year round, and features a non competitive application process for the award of assessment services. Services include site assessments, cleanup options and cost estimates, and community outreach. Services are for an average of $100,000. For more information, contact Bob Rosen at rosen.bob@epa.gov or (404) 562-8761.

U.S. EPA Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Grants

This grant program provides funding to recipients to conduct research, technical assistance and training that will result in an area-wide plan and implementation strategy for key brownfield sites, which will help inform the assessment, cleanup and reuse of brownfields properties and promote area-wide revitalization. Funding is directed to specific areas, such as a neighborhood, downtown district, local commercial corridor, or city block, affected by a single large or multiple brownfield sites. State, local, and tribal governments; quasi-governmental entities; and nonprofits are eligible to apply for up to $200,000. Funding is usually available every 1-2 years, with a deadline in the late summer/fall. Contact your regional EPA staff for more information.

U.S. EPA Brownfields Assessment Grants

Assessment grants provide funding for a grant recipient to inventory, characterize, assess, and conduct planning and community involvement related to brownfields sites. These grants are available to state, local, and tribal governments and quasi-governmental entities. Up to $200,000 is available per site, with larger amounts with a waiver or for a coalition of applicants. The RFP is released annually, generally during the fall. Contact your regional EPA staff for more information.

U.S. EPA Brownfields Cleanup Grants

Cleanup grants provide funding for a grant recipient to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. These grants are available annually, and are available to state, local, and tribal governments; quasi-governmental entities; and nonprofits. The applicant must own the site. Up to $200,000 is available per site, and the grant requires a 20% cost share. The RFP is released annually, generally during the fall. Contact your regional EPA staff for more information.

U.S. EPA Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grants

Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) grants provide funding for a grant recipient to capitalize a revolving loan fund and to provide subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. When loans are repaid, the loan amount is returned into the fund and re-lent to other borrowers, providing an ongoing source of capital within a community. Eligible applicants include state, local, and tribal governments and quasi-governmental entities. Up to $1,000,000 is available with a 20% cost share requirement, and at least 60% of the total amount must be used for the RLF. The RFP is released annually, generally during the fall. Contact your regional EPA staff for more information.

U.S. EPA Environmental Workforce Development & Job Training Grants

Annual Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training grants provide funding to develop programs that recruit, train, and place predominantly low-income and minority, unemployed and under-employed people living in areas affected by brownfields and other environmental contaminants in secure full-time, sustainable employment in the environmental field and in assessment and cleanup work taking place in their communities. Each Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) grant may be funded up to $200,000 over a three year period. Nonprofits; local, state, and tribal governments; colleges and universities; and quasi-governmental entities are eligible to apply. The RFP is generally released at the beginning of every year. Contact your regional EPA staff for more information.

U.S. EPA Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

States and tribes use LUST money to support underground storage tank cleanup and prevention programs; oversee corrective actions by responsible parties; and clean up sites that require prompt action to protect human health and the environment and/ or where the responsible party is unknown, unwilling or unable to perform the cleanup. LUST funding may be available for abandoned sites, which pose emergency risks to health or the environment or where the expected cleanup is beyond the financial capability of the responsible party. For more information, contact your regional EPA office.

U.S. HUD Community Development Block Grants

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) are flexible funding tools that address a wide range of community and economic development needs, including decent housing, healthy living environments, and expanded economic opportunity. Funds are allocated by a set formula directly to “entitlement communities,” areas comprised of central cities of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, metropolitan cities with populations of at least 50,000, and qualified urban counties with populations of 200,000 or more (excluding the populations of entitlement cities). States typically distribute CDBG funds to rural counties (those with populations less than 200,000, excluding the populations of entitlement cities) and other areas not qualified as entitlement communities through a competitive process. Grant activities must benefit low‐ and moderate‐income persons, aid in the prevention or elimination of slum and blight, or meet urgent community development needs.

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (DOLETA) Grants

DOLETA provides grants and technical assistance to support high quality job training, employment, labor market information, and income maintenance services primarily through state and local workforce development systems. For more information, contact your Regional Office.

USDA Rural Development Agency (RDA) - Rural Business Development Grants

RBDG is a competitive grant designed to support targeted technical assistance, training and other activities leading to the development or expansion of small and emerging private businesses in rural areas that have fewer than 50 employees and less than $1 million in gross revenues. Programmatic activities are separated into enterprise or opportunity type grant activities. RBDG funds must be directed for projects benefitting rural areas or towns outside the urbanized periphery of any city with a population of 50,000 or more. There is no maximum grant amount; however, grants generally range from $10,000 up to $500,000.  There is no cost sharing requirement.   

Grant funds must be used on projects to benefit small and emerging  businesses in rural areas as specified in the grant application, including the following:

  • Acquisition or development of land, easements, or rights of way; construction, conversion, renovation, of buildings, plants, machinery, equipment, access streets and roads, parking areas, utilities
  • Pollution control and abatement
  • Community economic development

For more information contact your local or state USDA Rural Development office.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

USACE executes projects emphasizing ecosystem restoration, inland and coastal navigation, and flood and storm damage reduction that may be contaminated property-related, and provides technical support on a cost-reimbursable basis to federal agencies for assessment and cleanup activities.  The Corps can assist with the redevelopment of brownfield sites that are proximate to waterways.

Services can include:

  • water, soil & sediment testing;
  • site investigations,
  • feasibility studies,
  • remedial design & remedial action;
  • human health & ecological risk assessments;
  • expedited removal actions;
  • underground storage tank closure;
  • asbestos & lead paint abatement;
  • compliance assessments;
  • ordinance removal;
  • pollution prevention projects;
  • stormwater management; and
  • hazardous waste management.

For more information, contact your local Corps office.

US Small Business Administration (SBA)

SBA provides information and other non-financial technical assistance for redevelopment efforts, offers loan guarantees to support small businesses, and assists in developing management and marketing skills. SBA offers a variety of loan programs, including the following:

The 7(a) Loan Program, SBA’s most common loan program, includes financial help for businesses with special requirements.

The CDC/504 Loan Program provides financing for major fixed assets such as equipment or real estate.

From starting up or expanding your business to recovering from disasters, SBA loan programs are available to help your business succeed.

For more information, locate and your SBA District Office at https://www.sba.gov/tools/local-assistance/districtoffices.

U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration Grant

DOT provides multiple grants for transit capital and maintenance projects, offers discretionary capital grants for new fixed guideway transit lines, bus-related facilities, and new buses and rail vehicles, funds transportation and land-use planning, and promotes delivery of safe and effective public and private transportation in non-urban areas. For more information, contact your FTA Regional Office.

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) Grants

ARC awards grants to projects that address one or more of the five goals identified by ARC in its 2016–2020 strategic plan, and offers planning and technical assistance to attract private investment to distressed areas to support new uses (targeted to local governments and development districts/non-profit entities in some cases).  Eligible activities include the following:

  • industrial site development;
  • business incubators;
  • special technical assistance and training;
  • expansion of domestic and foreign markets; and
  • basic infrastructure services that enhance economic development opportunities.

In distressed areas, ARC assistance may provide up to 80 percent of the total cost of a project. For more information, contact the local development district serving the county in which the project is located.

Economic Development Administration (EDA), Public Works and Economic Adjustment Assistance Program

EDA provides strategic investments on a competitive merit basis to support economic development, foster job creation, and attract private investment in economically distressed areas of the United States. EDA solicits applications from applicants in order to provide investments that support construction, non-construction, technical assistance, and revolving loan fund projects under EDA’s Public Works and EAA programs. Grants and cooperative agreements made under these programs are designed to leverage existing regional assets and support the implementation of economic development strategies that advance new ideas and creative approaches to advance economic prosperity in distressed communities. There are no submission deadlines, and awards range from $100,000-3,000,000. For more information, contact your EDA Regional Office.

Northern Border Regional Commission, Economic & Infrastructure Development (EID) Program

The Northern Border Regional Commission is a Federal-State partnership for economic and community development within the most distressed counties of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. The NBRC's Economic & Infrastructure Development (EID) Investment program projects include those that develop the transportation, telecommunication and basic public infrastructure within the region; assist the region in obtaining job skills and employment related education, as well as entrepreneurship, technology and business development; and encourage resource conservation, tourism, recreation, and preservation of open spaces in a manner consistent with economic development goals. Eligible EID investment recipients include municipalities, counties, non-profits, Native American tribes, and states. The maximum investment for any one project is $250,000. All investments are in the form of reimbursements for previously paid and eligible expenses. Applications for 2016 were available in March and due in June. For more information, call the NBRC at (603) 369-3001.

Federal Funding for Indian and Tribal Governments

US EPA Section 128(a) Grant Program

Section 128(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), authorizes a noncompetitive $50 million grant program to establish and enhance state and tribal response programs. CERCLA section 128(a) response program grants are funded with categorical State and Tribal Assistance Grant (STAG) appropriations.  Requests for funding were accepted for FY2017 from November 1 – December 31, 2016. For more information, contact your Regional EPA Brownfields contact.

US EPA Environmental Justice Small Grants Program

The Environmental Justice Small Grants Program provides financial assistance to eligible nonprofit organizations and tribal governments to build collaborative partnerships, identify local environmental and public health issues, envision solutions, and empower the community through education, training, and outreach. Environmental Justice Small Grants fund projects up to $30,000

Indian Environmental General Assistance Program Act

This act authorized EPA to provide General Assistance Program (GAP) grants to federally recognized tribes and tribal consortia for planning, developing and establishing environmental protection programs in Indian country, and for developing and implementing solid and hazardous waste programs on tribal lands. The goal of GAP (CFDA 66.926) is to assist tribes and intertribal consortia in developing the capacity to manage their own environmental protection programs, and to develop and implement solid and hazardous waste programs in accordance with individual tribal needs and applicable federal laws and regulations.

The Indian Community Development Block Grant Program

The Indian Community Development Block Grant Program provides grants to develop decent housing, suitable living environments, and economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons in Indian and Alaska Native communities. Eligible applicants include any Indian tribe, band, group, or nation or Alaska Native village which has established a relationship with the federal government as defined in the program regulations. Funds can be used for housing rehabilitation, land acquisition for new housing construction, the construction of community infrastructure such as roads and water and sewer facilities, community buildings, and commercial, industrial, and agricultural projects.

Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) Program in Indian Country

The UST program in Indian country works to improve human health and the environment in Indian country by working with tribes to prevent releases from USTs; ensure releases are cleaned up; and collaborate and strengthen the relationship between EPA and tribes. Of the more than 560 federally recognized tribes about 200 have federally-regulated underground storage tanks on their lands. To learn more about this program, contact EPA's American Indian Environmental Office.

 

State Funding Resources

The following provides a summary of State & Tribal Brownfield funding available for states within EPA Regions 1, 3 and 4.


 
Establishing Remedial Action Plan

 

 

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